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UN Women: Drivers of Conflict on the Tunisia-Libya and Southern Libya Borders – Triggers, Livelihoods & Gender

UN Women: Drivers of Conflict on the Tunisia-Libya and Southern Libya Borders – Triggers, Livelihoods & Gender


Deadline: 29-Sep-20

UN Women, in partnership with the United States Institute of Peace and the World Food Programme, is seeking proposals to conduct research that will investigate the specific drivers of conflict along the Tunisia-Libya border and Libya’s southern borders, and examine how border dynamics affect livelihoods and where relevant, food security, all from a gender perspective; and with the intent to produce new data and recommendations, and identify new areas for research.

In each line of effort, the research will investigate the specific drivers of conflict and examine how border dynamics affect livelihoods and, where relevant, food security. The research will look at these categories of inquiry with a gender lens to identify similar and different impacts on women and men, girls and boys.

Objective

This research project will produce new data and recommendations for community actors, practitioners, and policy makers in Tunisia and Libya; and identify new areas for research that are useful to local actors, international practitioners, and policy makers.

The research along the two sets of borders will be carried out concurrently. This will ensure that any challenges during the data collection phase along one set of borders does not hinder the progress of the data collection, analysis and other steps in the research methodology in the other. Applicants should consider organizing their key personnel accordingly.
The responsible party will be responsible for:

Obtaining and maintaining institutional review board (IRB) approvals, as required
Designing the research methodology;
Selecting and/or designing the data collection instruments;
Collecting the data in partnership with local Tunisian and Libyan partners; and
Analyzing the data, validating findings, and delivering the final report that describes the research process, answers the agreed research questions and provides actionable programmatic and policy recommendations.
Funding Information

The budget range for this proposal should be [75,000 USD Max.)]
Timeframe

Start Date: As soon as possible (22 October 2020)
End date: 3 months after start date (22 February 2021)
Geographic Areas of Focus

The research will be separated into two lines of effort divided by geographic focus:

The first line of effort will focus on border crossings and surrounding communities along the Tunisian and Libyan border.
Main Points of Entry: Ras Jdir and Dehiba/Wazin
Primary communities on Tunisian side of the border: Ben Guerdane, Medenine, Zarzis, Dehiba, Remada, Tataouine
Primary communities on Libyan side of the border: Zultan, Zwara, Wazin, Nalut, and secondary communities affected by border dynamics.
The second line of effort will focus on border crossings and surrounding communities connected to Libya’s borders with Algeria, Niger, Chad, and Sudan.
Main Points of Entry: Debdeb, Al-Sayen (near Ghat), and Al-Toum (south of Murzuq), Sarra (Chad) and Awihat (Sudan)
Routes crossing informal entry points and checkpoints c. Primary communities on the Libyan side of the border: Ghat, Ubari, Sebha, Murzuq, Kufra, and others affected by border dynamics
Eligibility Criteria

UN-Women is soliciting proposals from Civil Society Organizations (CSOs).
Women’s organizations or entities are highly encouraged to apply.
Proven track record in policy-oriented research projects including the development of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in research that mainstreams gender considerations throughout research.
Essential personnel’s proficiency in Arabic and French.
Institutional knowledge of border conflict dynamics in Libya and Tunisia.
For more information, visit https://arabstates.unwomen.org/en/what-we-do/programme-implementation/drivers-of-conflict-on-the-tunisia-libya-and-southern-libya-borders-cfp

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